Thrive, Zeitgeist and the Illusion of Conspiracy Activism.

Although the main objective of Thrive is informational—to disseminate conspiracy theories and promote right-wing libertarian political ideology—it cannot be ignored that Thrive’s makers and a lot of its supporters say they want to take action. On this very blog Foster Gamble, creator of Thrive, has dismissed the utility of discussing the factual errors and distortions in his film, in favor of “creating solutions.” Unfortunately, the “solutions” that Thrive fans say they want are aimed overwhelmingly at exposing and combating the various conspiracy theories that the film asserts exist. This is the central tragedy of conspiracy thinking—that it diverts people’s energies and attentions away from solving real problems in the real world, and instead motivates them to solve fake problems endemic to the fantasy world in which conspiracy theorists dwell.

This article will discuss the phenomena of what I call “conspiracy activism.” Thrive is not the first conspiracy movie to spark an activist response. Mr. Gamble’s film exists in the context of a conspiracist underground that has, in recent years, been rapidly transformed by the Internet, and is continuing to evolve quickly. I wrote about this in an article over at my other blog, which I also publicized on this one. You can consider this article to be sort of a companion piece to that one.

What Is The “Thrive Movement” And What Is It Actually Doing?

Before we get to the topic of conspiracy activism in general, let’s look at what “solutions” the Thrive people are promoting. There is no “Thrive Movement” to speak of in any real sense. Foster Gamble is not, so far as I can tell, attempting to exert any sort of real control over the activities or direction of the film’s fans, and I’ve seen no evidence that the fans of the movie are trying to organize themselves.

Clicking the “Solutions” tab on the Thrive website unleashes a dizzying avalanche of propaganda. The vast majority of it is right-wing libertarian propaganda, such as the “Liberty” page which assaults the reader with political diatribes studded with quotes from libertarian deities like Stefan Molyneux, Ron Paul and Ayn Rand. Although Thrive’s political agenda is a serious issue, we and others have dealt with it before. The key message is “vote for libertarians,” and thus we’ll leave the film’s political advocacy at that.

More interesting are the “Critical Mass Actions” tabs. Here the Thrive people have listed twelve specific campaigns they’re promoting, with icons where you (as an Internet user) can “sign up” or else embed the icon itself on another site. If you click the icons so sign up, it produces a box where you fill in your email info and hit submit. Almost all of the links included in the “Critical Mass Actions” sections are to websites or online petitions. Of these twelve campaigns, two are anti-Federal Reserve; three are related to protesting GMO food; two relate to “free energy” devices; two are protests of “chemtrails,” a conspiracy theory promoted by the film; one is anti-nuclear power; one is “protect Internet freedom”; and one protests resource extraction on Native American lands.

The Federal Reserve is what Thrive identifies as the linchpin of a worldwide conspiracy theory to enslave the globe through the use of deceptive currency practices. We debunked the film’s money conspiracy theories here. “Free energy” does not exist, as we have also demonstrated. “Chemtrails” have not been debunked on this site, but they’ve been amply debunked elsewhere; it’s abundantly clear that “chemtrails” are a total fantasy. You don’t have to be a conspiracy theorist to oppose GMO foods, but Thrive couches its criticism of such foods in expressly conspiratorial terms; they think it’s some weird kind of plot aimed at killing people with poisons in the food.

These issues account for nine of the twelve “Critical Mass Actions.” Of the twelve, only three—anti-nuclear power, protecting Internet freedom, and protesting resource extraction on Native American lands—are not somehow addressing the conspiracy theories the film promotes.

Ironically, it is one of these three non-conspiratorial solutions—the Internet freedom icon—that had the most people (5,547 on the day I checked) signed up.

When it comes to what these “Critical Mass Actions” actually are, the website is extremely vague. Here’s what it says when you click on a question about “how do you know when an action reaches critical mass?”

“As actions gain momentum and the most popular ones become apparent we will set a target number for “critical mass.” We will keep in touch via email to make sure you know when we’re approaching critical mass. What determines an effective “critical mass” will vary according to the nature of the action to be taken. The critical mass number will be announced as far in advance as possible and will be determined by what would create significant impact and assure optimal security for participants.”

That’s it. You’ll get an email once they decide how many people they need. In the meantime, it’s a lot of Internet petitions and “getting the word out.” That’s what the Thrive Movement is doing—that, and organizing local screenings of the film itself. The act of promoting Thrive is itself treated as a form of activism to which fans should aspire.

Is This Real Activism?

No. The “solutions” offered on Thrive’s website are ineffective in changing anything in the real world for two reasons: first, the vast majority of them are aimed at ameliorating conspiracy theories that don’t exist; and second, even for the non-conspiratorial goals, there is no actual real-world activity being proposed. Thrive’s brand of activism is a complete chimera.

Take chemtrails, for example. We know for a fact that chemtrails do not exist. The elaborate narrative that conspiracy theorists construct—that a “Global Domination Elite” is spraying chemicals into the sky to sicken and kill people deliberately—is simply fantasy. Yet, Mr. Gamble wants to “Expose Chemtrails With a Mass Protest at NOAA Offices.” Even assuming that legions of Thrive fans get organized and storm NOAA’s headquarters, what effect is this going to have? NOAA can’t do anything because there’s nothing to do anything about. Chemtrails do not exist. This is a “solution” that, even if it’s pulled off, will accomplish exactly zero, except wasting the time of the people involved.

As to the second criticism, it’s difficult to see how these “Critical Mass Actions” will have any effect regardless of the goals they’re aimed at. Take for example the critical mass action about stopping the environmental poisoning of Native American communities—which is a goal I think most people would agree with, and is one of the few that isn’t specifically directed at a conspiracy theory. Here’s what Foster Gamble wants you to click to sign up for:

“In the US, indigenous lands are being exploited and targeted by big business for resource extraction, nuclear dumping, and more. There are proposals for coal, oil, gold and copper mines, coal bed methane, natural gas “fracking,” and nuclear storage that threaten these communities and the environment.  This is a chance to stand up for Native American rights and show that we are committed not just to apologizing for past wrongs, but ending the violations that continue to this day.”

Okay…but how? What does this actually mean?

What are the Thrive fans going to do? There’s no protest march planned. There’s no letter-writing campaign. There’s no attempt to introduce legislation or lobby lawmakers. There’s no fundraiser. There’s no outreach to any of the Native American communities impacted by resource extraction. There’s not even a link to an online petition, as there is for the “End the Fed” suggestion. There is exactly…nothing.

You click on, sign up and get an email. That’s it.

In the meantime—or, should I say, in the real world—if you care about resource extraction harming Native American communities, there are real people doing real things to try to stop this. In less than five minutes of searching online I came across this site for the Wolf River Protection Fund which is seeking to buy key lands to protect the watersheds and wetlands related to Native American communities in Wisconsin. One of the tribes associated with this fund recently celebrated a huge victory by buying out—yes, actually buying out—a mining company that was planning to mine near their lands. That’s activism. Not just clicking on a website—but actually sending your dollars to an organization that is taking action to make a real-world impact. And yes, the Wolf River Protection Fund does take donations.

Thrive isn’t doing anything even close to this.

So If They’re Not Making a Difference In the Real World, What Are They Doing?

They’re promoting conspiracy theories and related ideology—in Thrive’s case, right-wing libertarian ideology. The promotion of the ideology is the ultimate point of the activism.

This is understandable, if you analyze the thought processes of Thrive’s makers and fans from the standpoint of their conspiracy beliefs. They believe that all or most of the world’s problems stem from actions taken in secret by groups of shadowy conspirators. How best to combat these actions? Expose the secrets and shine a light on the conspirators. Then, it is presumed, the nefarious activity will end, and things will get better.

Seen from this standpoint, the act of exposure is the most important action. Therefore, most of a conspiracy theorist’s preferred “solutions” for solving problems start and end from a “get the word out” type paradigm. Indeed, most of the nine conspiracy-oriented Critical Mass Action suggestions on the Thrive website are aimed at information exposure or gaining visibility for something. This is classic conspiracy activism.

Why Do Conspiracy Theorists Engage in Conspiracy Activism?

It used to be that conspiracy theorists weren’t activists. There were certainly groups of them, and there have been conspiracy-related newsletters—especially related to the JFK assassination—circulating for decades. But traditionally they didn’t try to reach out to the mainstream or get others to join them.

That changed with 9/11. The purveyors of conspiracy theories related to the 9/11 attacks—especially Richard Gage and David Ray Griffin—changed the stakes in the mid-2000s by waging concerted, energized campaigns to try to increase the exposure of their conspiracy theories and encourage people to believe in them. Ultimately their success was only temporary; as I pointed out in an earlier blog here, contrary to something Foster Gamble says in Thrive, fewer people believe that “9/11 was an inside job” today than have so believed at any time since 9/11 itself. However, the conspiracy activism of 9/11 Truthers upped the ante and set a new paradigm, vastly aided by the rise of the Internet: if you believe in conspiracy theories, now you’re expected to go out there in public and try to get others to believe in them as well.

As the conspiracy world has changed, and (as I argued in February) conspiracy theorists have gone from defining “victory” as increasing the numbers who believe their theories to selling prepackaged ideologies, the activism component remains. Now what conspiracy theorists are selling are the ideologies, not the theories, but they’re still self-motivated to try to proselytize in exactly the same was Richard Gage and David Ray Griffin did with their nonsense 9/11 theories. I argued in the February blog that it was Zeitgeist: The Movie and its conspiracy-activist offshoot, the Zeitgeist Movement, that cemented this development into the basic blueprint of future conspiracy endeavors.

As there are many instructive lessons for evaluating Thrive inherent in the Zeitgeist story, let’s turn to that next.

Why Conspiracy Activism is Pointless: The Example of the Zeitgeist Movement.

One of the first statements I ever made about Thrive was that it appeared to be “Zeitgeist 2.0.” Clearly the movie imitates a lot of features of Peter Joseph’s notoriously fact-free 2007 Internet conspiracy film Zeitgeist, and even the suggestion of a “Thrive Movement,” aping the Zeitgeist Movement, indicates a kindred spirit.

The Zeitgeist Movement, founded in 2008 by Peter Joseph, attempted to capitalize on the interest generated among conspiracy theorists from the first Zeitgeist film to sell a neo-Utopian ideology called the Venus Project, which resembles late-stage Marxism except with computers and technology in the role of the dictatorship of the proletariat. The problem with the Zeitgeist Movement and the Venus Project, however, was that support for the non-conspiratorial (but deeply flawed) “Resource Based Economy” paradigm was built entirely on the backs of conspiracist beliefs and the popularity of Zeitgeist: The Movie. Most fans joined the Zeitgeist Movement because they were attracted by the conspiracy explanations; to the extent the movement’s leaders could motivate them to care about the Venus Project and a Resource Based Economy for its own sake, it was mainly presented as a “cure” for all those horrible conspiracies. As a result, “get the word out” type activist projects meant to promote the Venus Project and Resource Based Economy became increasingly conflated with promoting the Zeitgeist movies and its conspiracy worldview.

The Zeitgeist Movement imploded in April 2011 when the Venus Project side of the organization divorced itself from the group as a result of a dispute over donations. Since then the Zeitgeist Movement has dwindled to an insignificant core of high-commitment fans who do little more than post occasional comments on blogs or YouTube videos. (Zeitgeist Movement supporters constantly show up on the Thrive website comments, still valiantly trying to sell their Resource Based Economy shtick. Few Thrive fans are buying). The Zeitgeist Movement’s attempts at conspiracy activism could never effectively outpace the reach of the films themselves. Unlike the Thrive Movement, the Zeitgeist Movement did have a central, engaged, hands-on leader who directed the group; in fact that was one of its downfalls, because Peter Joseph’s inept leadership of the group transformed it into something very much like a cult surrounding him personally and his films.

The failure of the Zeitgeist Movement can teach Thrive fans an important lesson: that conspiracy activism is inherently self-limiting. Five years after its release, Zeitgeist: The Movie is now old news. Most conspiracy theorists have seen it. The sequels which completed the Resource Based Economy narrative could barely achieve a tiny fraction of the impact that the first film had, because the second and third Zeitgeist films dealt much less with conspiracy theories. Essentially, when Zeitgeist stopped talking about conspiracy theories, the Internet stopped listening. With the market of potential converts already saturated, the Zeitgeist Movement sputtered into oblivion. Once you “get the word out” about your pet conspiracy theories or the ideology you’re promoting by using conspiracy theories, where do you go from there? Zeitgeist couldn’t answer this question. It’s unlikely Thrive will be able to either.

Does Clicking Links, Watching Videos and Signing Online Petitions Really Help?

There’s another more fundamental reason why Thrive’s conspiracy activism will have no real-world impact other than to “get the word out” about what they think the world is like. Most of the consumers of this material, especially those who are heavy Internet users, aren’t really willing to do more than click links, watch videos and sign online petitions. Very, very few of them will actually be motivated to go out of their homes and do something in the real (non-cyber) world. This is just a fact of life. If you put a website up about any cause, however well-intentioned, the more you actually have to do to take action on it, the fewer people you’ll have who will make the effort. People click “like” buttons and share links because it’s easy and they can do it in the flash of an eye. Only the truly devoted will be motivated to get in their cars and go to a preplanned event; fewer still will do that if it will cost them money. This is a self-limiting factor of Internet activism.

The problem is even worse when the main audience you’re preaching to consists of conspiracy theorists. Conspiracy theorists are notoriously lazy. Few of them, for example, can even be motivated enough by their beliefs even to pick up a book and read it. To them, videos on the Internet are just as good as books, and they require much less effort to comprehend. Most conspiracy theorists have virtually no awareness of the depth of knowledge the world contains beyond the Internet or how to access that knowledge. Many of them live their lives in an online bubble; if it’s not happening on the web, it’s not worth knowing about. If this is the crowd you’re trying to draw activists from, the chances of finding supporters who are high-commitment enough to meet in person, put together a viable plan of action on something and see it through to the end are much reduced.

That’s not to say that this doesn’t happen. In the heyday of 9/11 Truth theories, for example, hundreds of Truthers would gather at Ground Zero in New York City and harass people by shouting conspiracy garbage at them through bullhorns. But what did they do beyond that? Note that even this real-world activity is just another species of “getting the word out,” albeit in an extremely destructive, annoying and disagreeable way that turned off and angered far more people than it attracted. Even the 9/11 Truth organizations, like the ridiculous “Architects & Engineers for 9/11 Truth”—clearly an organization created by the most high-commitment supporters of the conspiracy theory—continue to focus their efforts on “getting the word out” as opposed to actually doing anything. In the very, very few instances where they do try something other than “getting the word out”—like filing a lawsuit, as one group of 9/11 Truthers attempted—they always meet with spectacular failure.

Activism in the real world is hard. It takes money, time, effort and competent people to guide the activity toward any real goal. Conspiracy theorists are mostly kids. They don’t have a lot of money. What time they have they usually spent on the Internet. Exerting real-world effort happens in a few rare cases, but not very often. Competent people who can actually think something through and put something together are about as rare in this subculture as blue diamonds.

As a result, conspiracy theorists rationalize. They lower the bar and define what they are willing to do as “activism.” Thus, the sort of low-intensity effort that they can get many people to do—clicking “like” buttons, sharing links, watching videos and signing online petitions—becomes, in their minds, a substitute for real-world activism. In an endeavor where “getting the word out” has already been defined as the major goal, getting 10,000 people to click a “like” button becomes the equivalent of a smashing victory for right and justice.

Conclusion: Do You Really Want to Help?

This article has demonstrated why conspiracy activism is pointless and counterproductive. I can hear the shouts from angry Thrive fans now: “Why don’t you stop blogging and do something that actually helps?” (This assumes that I do nothing but write blogs all day—obviously an incorrect assumption).

What can you do to make the world a better place instead of watching Internet conspiracy videos or wasting time on the Thrive website (or this one)?

Here’s something you can do: give blood. This is one of the easiest things you can do, and one which has a huge real-world impact—you can literally save someone’s life. Here’s a website where you can type in your zip code and find out where to go in your area to give blood.

http://www.redcrossblood.org/

Here’s something you can do: become a tutor for adult literacy. You can find organizations that do this all over the country. Here’s just one example, from Florida.

http://www.adultliteracyleague.org/volunteers/orientation.html

Here’s something you can do: get a group of people together and assemble care packages of medical supplies for AIDS sufferers in Africa. This has been a hugely successful program. It also has real-world impacts. Here’s how to get involved.

http://www.worldvision.org/content.nsf/getinvolved/caregiver-kits-church-volunteer-activity

Here’s something you can do: donate money to the American Indian College Fund. This fund helps people from America’s least-college-educated demographic get access to higher education. This helps real people in the real world. Here’s how to donate:

http://www.collegefund.org/content/donate

There you go. Stop watching Internet conspiracy movies and go do some good in the world. You have no excuse now.

About these ads

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

75 responses to “Thrive, Zeitgeist and the Illusion of Conspiracy Activism.”

  1. Mason I. Bilderberg says :

    Reblogged this on Illuminutti and commented:
    “This is the central tragedy of conspiracy thinking—that it diverts people’s energies and attentions away from solving real problems in the real world, and instead motivates them to solve fake problems endemic to the fantasy world in which conspiracy theorists dwell.” – EXACTLY

    • George says :

      Interesting article. I like the way the author actually goes on to explain the good and the bad aspects of the movie. The main issue I have though is the constant use of the word conspiracy. Why must something always be a ‘conspiracy theory’, not an ‘alternative theory’? I really do despise the way that we as human beings always group things, there never seems to be a middle ground. Its like ALL alternative theories are lies and ALL commonly accepted mainstream theories are truth, that in itself is ridiculous. Could there be more to the hidden values of cannabis, could 911 have been something else than the dribble fed to us by the media? of course it could, but then could HAARP technology any planned natural disasters be fictional and impossible? of course they could. See what I did there, I created a middle group. I find that human tribalism and the attachment to a single belief system ultimately blinds us from accepting various things. The sooner both sets of people accept that this middle ground may exist, the sooner we will get to certain truths.

      • Wyboth says :

        That’s true, it is natural for humans to group those who don’t agree with them into an “other” group. However, I doubt there will ever be a middle ground on this blog. It’s pretty black and white: either you support the theories or you don’t (I didn’t use the word conspiracy to avoid the grouping dilemma). I think the reason why we brand them as conspiracy theories instead of alternative theories is because they’re downright ludicrous. This provides distinction from alternative theories, which are usually plausible. The reason why most of us ignore the conspiracy theories and believe the mainstream theories is because the mainstream ones make sense and are supported by evidence and reason. Conspiracy theories are not. So, while a middle ground is a good thing to have in certain circumstances, I am doubtful that one will ever develop in this field.

  2. The Locke says :

    Everything that conspiracy theorists seems to do is more annoying then actually useful, and most don’t do a damn thing in the real world at all when it concerns their conspiracy theories.

    There is about 96,000 people in the city I live in, Yet I’ve only seen one poster about one type of 9/11 conspiracy theory…

  3. Nameless says :

    This underlines how conspiracy theorists are so fond of proselytising on the internet on behalf of what is basically an imaginary belief system, which they seem to do just for entertainment. They are obsessed with spreading information but it doesn’t serve any actual purpose. When someone comes along and says, “Your information is incorrect” they get all defensive and accuse them of being a “disinformation agent” as if they were some kind of evil infidel or stupid brainwashed heathen that must be spurned. It’s all so banal, there’s no political discourse, it’s just about reproducing information about weird hidden connections, meanings and symbols in the activities of governments, corporations and rich people etc. I’m not sure that many of them realise that the historical roots of conspiracy theory culture is actually in Christian fundamentalism and extreme right-wing ideologies, but in any case now that it tends towards a more apparently liberal ufological / New Age outlook it does not make it any more credible in terms of any genuine political theory or action.

    • muertos says :

      This comment is extremely insightful and absolutely spot-on. Thanks for putting it so succinctly.

      • Nameless says :

        Cheers, Muertos and thanks to you for opening up the field of debate on these issues.

    • EyesWideOpen says :

      I used to rant and use big words like you….. till I got shot in the knee with an arrow…. supposedly it was a Rockefeller thug but I’m not gonna start a conspiracy about it because i like my metaphorical l other knee

    • Antonio M says :

      “I’m not sure that many of them realise that the historical roots of conspiracy theory culture is actually in Christian fundamentalism…”

      Woah, woah, WOAH!!! It’s one thing to put these conspiracy whack-jobs in their place, but don’t start comparing them to Christians. As a born and raised Catholic, I take that as an insult… Talk about those Islamic bastards all you want, but don’t disrespect my religion…

      • Mr. Anon says :

        What he is referring to is Christian FUNDAMENTALISM. Fundamentalism of any belief is dangerous. There’s plenty of good Christians, just as there are many good Muslims and Buddhists and nonbelievers.

    • stratoblaster says :

      The articles author muertos suggests that attempts to “get the word out” via websites and such is a failed path to solutions. So what exactly is this article attempting if not the same?

  4. Jakob says :

    Well said! :)

  5. Myles O'Howe says :

    http://www.justice.gc.ca/eng/pi/const/lawreg-loireg/p2t31.html

    The government repeals other laws! Cannabis prohibition could have been ended decades ago. that website proves it! Thousands of Canadians are federally licensed to possess and use medical marijuana through

    This blog poster is posting conspiracy theories mixed with truth, i dont even know where to begin on the deceptions he promotes solutions that serve a select few and dont save the planet from the poisonous pollution. he posted truth, lured the reader in, and laid deceptions, WHY ISNT this blog poster telling the truth about cannabis hemp it is the real solution cannabis plants create oxygen and ozone, breathing in CO2, cannabis create more oxygen per acre compared to trees, so many elitist mother fuckers think they are better people for not smoking pot and think its ok to ignore cannabis and censor truth i have so much proof of censorship from the phony truth movement I have evidence for my claims http://mylesohowe.wordpress.com/censorship/

    big money interests who paid for distractions in the media they own have been distracting everyone from ending cannabis prohibition and the first link in my message is PROOF of the lack of cooperation while people suffer.

    WHAT ABOUT ALL THE POISONOUS POLLUTION POISONING EVERYONE WHERE ARE THE SOLUTIONS OF THAT? the movie thrive on youtube has half a million views when i last seen it and clear compass media who censored my thrive exposed videos on youtube and vimeo have been censoring truth. hemp fuel could have ALREADY made USA energy independent, and other countries if people shared the truth. LACK OF KNOWLEDGE of cannabis is why prohibition is still going on!

    Health Canada who have permission to have a limited amount of cannabis!

    The government of Canada is preventing a Free Market while Canadian’s suffer and die. The government is fixing the price of food, energy, fuel, fiber, medicine keeping the cost of living artificially high by maintaining cannabis prohibition. Nobody dies from cannabis and water kills people. If people knew the truth there is no way the Canada could maintain cannabis prohibition, please share this far and wide.

    End Cannabis Prohibition and Repeal the unconstitutional law(s) The prohibition against marijuana was unconstitutional from its inception.

    Definition of CARTEL:
    1: a written agreement between belligerent nations
    2: a combination of independent commercial or industrial enterprises designed to limit competition or fix prices
    3: a combination of political groups for common action

    Example of CARTEL: a cartel of oil-producing nations that controls production and influences prices

    Cannabis needs to be exempted from all laws practically everywhere, the only way to put the cartels out of business is to allow the cultivation, processing, transportation, distribution, sales, trade, sharing, possession, consumption and use of cannabis (hemp) for industrial, medicinal, nutritional and recreational purposes repealed. Nobody has any right to restrict anyone, any age, a harmless plant safer than drinking water.

    Legalized Medicinal marijuana is a scam because it discriminates and limits the public’s access to this harmless medicine that saves lives. Nobody dies or suffers injury from THC. Governments test hemp fields for THC as if it were dangerous scaring farmers away from growing Hemp.

    Hemp would solve world hunger and most of the world problems like the energy crisis, deforestation, disease, repair our soils and renew with vital nutrients and so much more it would take too long to list. Pollution from poisonous energy sources like petroleum, coal, natural gas, nuclear, and the tar sands are poisoning the planet and canadians this whole time Hemp could replace all poisonous energy sources while creating oxygen and breathing in CO2. Hemp uses less water no herbicides and no pesticides. The first diesel fuel was made from oil pressed from hemp seeds. It’s non-toxic, a nitrogen fixer, grows well nearly everywhere, a renewable resource, makes food, fuel, paper, rope, medicine, cosmetics, plastic, housing and much more.

    If cannabis prohibition ended so many new businesses and jobs would be created instantly. Everything made from toxic oil today, can be made from non-toxic hemp. Any limits or restrictions on hemp are preventing a free market. Would you want a license to grow vegetables? The idea of having a license for cannabis sounds like the Slave Master telling the slaves how many plants they can grow. Nobody has any right to dictate!

    • Myles O'Howe says :

      this blog has been distracting everyone from ending cannabis prohibition just like everyone else as if cannabis was not an issue. cannabis plants create oxygen, breathe in CO2, hemp fuel can make america and other countries energy independent, I have many videos proving it. the internet is full of nonsense but there is good info out there to be found. there is so much green-washing/brainwashing going on, corporations who poison the planet talk about saving the earth and planting trees that create less oxygen than cannabis plants. i mean nobody dies from cannabis and water kills people. ending cannabis prohibition will be the greatest historical event mark my words its easy to see why big money wanted cannabis out of the picture.

      Thrive is big time disinfo, and I exposed so much information that would actually do something to change the world dwarfing anything else.

      Think about this how the fuck does an alternative media tell people about a coming world government single worldwide currency and promote ron paul who admitted “There is nothing to fear from globalism, free trade, and a single worldwide currency”

      its all admitted the ignorance is everywhere, WISE UP all your work has been distracting people from real solutions i told you the truth a long time ago on your blog this world needs cooperation not ignorance people are suffering and dying the cost of living is artificially high. There is nothing wrong with proper research of conspiracies and anomalies, there is something wrong with all the controlled opposition

      “The best way to control the opposition is to lead it ourselves.” ~Vladimir Lenin

      controlled opposition has run a muck attacking conspiracy theories. i get attacked people with such closed minds dont even look into the truth they just ignore me because i have cannabis in my videos. thats how ignorant the world is i get ridiculed for trying to end cannabis prohibition and censored. if people knew the truth there is no way cannabis prohibition could be maintained this is utter insanity how there is not everyone working together to end cannabis prohibition.

      GIVING BLOOD why not give cannabis, plant cannabis plants create oxygen lack of oxygen kills brain cells ignore this all you want your brain cells are dying from lack of oxygen

      One way to neutralize a potential activist is to get them to be in a group that does all the wrong things. Why? The message doesn’t get out. A lot of time is wasted. The activist is frustrated and discouraged. Nothing good is accomplished.

      FBI, CSIS, CIA, Police Informers and Infiltrators will infest any group and they have phoney activist organizations established.

      Their purpose is to prevent any real movement for justice or eco-peace from developing.

      Agents come in small, medium or large. They can be of any ethnic background. They can be male or female.

      The actual size of the group or movement being infiltrated is irrelevant. It is the potential the movement has for becoming large which brings on the spies and saboteurs.

      COINTELPRO is still in operation today under a different code name. It is no longer placed on paper where it can be discovered through the freedom of information act.

      The FBI counterintelligence program’s stated purpose: To expose, disrupt, misdirect, discredit, and otherwise neutralize individuals who the FBI categorize as opposed to the National Security Interests. “National Security” means the FBI’s security from the people ever finding out the vicious things it does in violation of people’s civil liberties.

      • SlayerX3 says :

        What have you been smoking to spout such insane amount of nonsense ?

        Oh wait never mind.

      • anticultist says :

        “GIVING BLOOD why not give cannabis, plant cannabis plants create oxygen lack of oxygen kills brain cells ignore this all you want your brain cells are dying from lack of oxygen” This quote needs to be laughed at a little bit longer.

        Smoking pot puts more oxygen into your brain ! Pure comedy stuff from the mind of a total pothead, thanks Miles.

    • muertos says :

      “Hemp would solve world hunger and most of the world problems like the energy crisis, deforestation, disease, repair our soils and renew with vital nutrients and so much more it would take too long to list…”

      LOL! Thanks for a good belly laugh. You should go to Santa Cruz and get loaded with Foster Gamble. He’d probably buy into your bizarre theories, and you could star in “Thrive II: What On Earth Will It Toke?”

    • SlayerX3 says :

      http://www.cracked.com/blog/5-pro-marijuana-arguments-that-arent-helping_p2/

      I really hate using Cracked articles as a source because they are a comedy website, but I hope it is blunt enough to crack your skull a little.

  6. Myles O'Howe says :

    I hope I wasnt too harsh in criticizing this blog for distracting which it has, so big deal report on truth and the people see whos side your on. all the anti cannabis thinking is insane. nobody dies from cannabis. water kills people. it took 13 years to end alcohol prohibition in america, now that everyone is either alcoholics, addicted to big pharma, coffee and other drugs like sugar, a lot of people dont care about “pot” meaning they dont care about human life they dont realize it but ignorance is not bliss think of all the lives that could have been saved if people shared truth.

    http://mylesohowe.wordpress.com/

    http://www.youtube.com/yellowecotec

    • Mr. Anon says :

      Thanks, but this isn’t a blog meant for you to advertise your political views, this is a blog about the conspiracy theory movie Thrive. If you want to advocate marijuana legalization, feel free to do so elsewhere, but such discussion is not what this blog is for.

    • The Locke says :

      I think you should probably stop smoking weed. It’s clearly affecting your thinking…

    • anticultist says :

      Pot heads rifle off their random claims and delusions, and then wonder why the rest of the world won’t take them seriously. Of course the rest of us who aren’t promoting such ludicrous beliefs as miles o really, are just shills or sheep unwilling to save the world by sitting on our sofas.

      It really makes me laugh when people like him come onto these blogs and off topic promote their paranoia and whacka doodle stuff.

      It further proves that these people are incapable of cohesive thinking and use their creative aspect thought processes as a substitute for reasoning. If you read his claims he makes such far reaching claims that it sounds no better than a politicians generalised rhetoric. Only his campaign is full of crazy conspiracy garbage.

      • panthervariable says :

        While I can’t say for certain, conspiracy-nut smokers were probably conspiracy nuts before they started. Or were raised in a family where such ideas where prevalent and thus preconditioned to moonbattery. I’ve read many smokers’ writings that a much more coherent and on-point than O’Howes, just as I’ve read many screeds like his.

        Where the pot is genuinely no good in that regard, is that it can be fairly “mind-opening” and thus make non-critical thinkers more susceptible to conspiracy theories. Not to mention make the theorists come up with more… creative ideas.

        Sadly, this comes back to bite rational cannabis enthusiasts in the ass, just as, say, (most) GMO opposition end up making environmentalists look bad.

  7. Hollywood Tomfortas says :

    The indefatigable anti-Fascist investigative reporter Dave Emory just wrote this article about THRIVE

    http://spitfirelist.com/news/thrive-counter-culture-fascism-in-cinema

    Dave quotes an excerpt from Eric Johnson’s new article in the San Jose Metroactive. (It’s mostly a re-hash of Eric’s Santa Cruz Weekly article, but he does expand on it. However, no comments are allowed.)

    http://www.metroactive.com/features/thrive-cult-film.html

    I copy below Dave Emory’s own comments about THRIVE before he quotes the Johnson excerpt.

    “Thrive”: Counter-Culture Fascism in Cinema

    The advance of fascism features a burgeoning array of media and organizational phenomena that direct people of more “progressive”–even “hip” orientation in the direction of bigotry and rightwing totalitarianism.

    In particular, anti-Semitism–denying that it is anti-Semitic–has become something of the “flavor de jeur” for much of the so-called progressive sector. The clouding of minds with mysticism has accelerated this trend, particularly among the young.

    A recent issue of the San Jose Metro – a free weekly paper in the Southern Bay Area –featured an incisive analysis by Eric Johnson. This important article dissected the fundamentals of a popular cult film entitled Thrive.

    The brainchild of Proctor & Gamble fortune heir Foster Gamble, the film fuses New Age mysticism and cult “free energy” mythology with Old Age anti-Semitic ideology pinning the world’s troubles on the Rothschilds and Jewish control of the financial industry. (Gamble himself holds forth on various subjects in the film itself.)

    In addition to Gamble himself, “Thrive” presents the fascist ideology of G. Edward Griffin, a prominent John Birch Society theoretician. (The origins of the John Birch Society are detailed in AFA #11.) In addition to his doctrinaire racism, demonizing the likes of Martin Luther King, Griffin tags the Federal Reserve System as a manifestation of the “Zionist” financial cabal.

    The most outlandish of the fascisti whose “thinking” is featured in the film is David Icke. A former soccer player, Icke has reinvented himself as a political guru, disseminating the view that the world’s power structure is controlled by “reptilian shape-shifters” who pose as humans, eat young children and, somehow, are part and parcel to the international financial conspiracy advanced by Griffin, Gamble and company.

    Another of the old-line fascists whose ideology is contained in the film is Eustace Mullins, although his influence is upon Gamble’s theoretical outlook, rather than in “Thrive” itself. An unabashed admirer of Adolf Hitler, Mullins is among the seminal fascist ideologues to tab the Fed as an outcropping of the “international Jewish banking conspiracy.”

    Not surprisingly Icke, Mullins and Griffin have been extolled by the so-called “Truthers.” Both have also been featured on the program of former Fox pundit Glenn Beck.

    In addition to the New Age mysticism, the film’s cache among “progressives” is strengthened by the inclusion of the likes of Deepak Chopra, Amy Goodman and environmentalist (and Baskin & Robbins heir) John Robbins.

    This, in combination with the dumbing-down of America, has fueled the popularity of “Thrive.“

    Not surprisingly, the film has garnered a considerable following among the “Occupy” movement, according to author Johnson.

    “Thrive” appears to be among the most successful manifestations to date of counter-culture fascism, adding something of a bohemian flavor to the old adage that anti-Semitism is “the socialism of fools.”

    (Author Peter Levenda, among others, has chronicled the overlap of alternative religions such as Satanism with fascist and Nazi elements in his book Unholy Alliance. The alternative religious connection/New Age phenomenon is central to the success of works like “Thrive.”)

  8. Hollywood Tomfortas says :

    The indefatigable anti-Fascist investigative reporter Dave Emory just wrote this article about THRIVE:

    “Thrive”: Counter-Culture Fascism in Cinema

    The advance of fascism features a burgeoning array of media and organizational phenomena that direct people of more “progressive”–even “hip” orientation in the direction of bigotry and rightwing totalitarianism.

    http://spitfirelist.com/news/thrive-counter-culture-fascism-in-cinema

    Dave quotes an excerpt from Eric Johnson’s new article in the San Jose Metroactive. (It’s mostly a re-hash of Eric’s Santa Cruz Weekly article, but he does expand on it. However, no comments are allowed.)

    http://www.metroactive.com/features/thrive-cult-film.html

    I copy below Dave Emory’s comments about THRIVE

    The advance of fascism features a burgeoning array of media and organizational phenomena that direct people of more “progressive”– even “hip” orientation in the direction of bigotry and rightwing totalitarianism.

    In particular, anti-Semitism–denying that it is anti-Semitic–has become something of the “flavor de jeur” for much of the so-called progressive sector. The clouding of minds with mysticism has accelerated this trend, particularly among the young.

    A recent issue of the San Jose Metro – a free weekly paper in the Southern Bay Area –featured an incisive analysis by Eric Johnson. This important article dissected the fundamentals of a popular cult film entitled Thrive.

    The brainchild of Proctor & Gamble fortune heir Foster Gamble, the film fuses New Age mysticism and cult “free energy” mythology with Old Age anti-Semitic ideology pinning the world’s troubles on the Rothschilds and Jewish control of the financial industry. (Gamble himself holds forth on various subjects in the film itself.)

    In addition to Gamble himself, “Thrive” presents the fascist ideology of G. Edward Griffin, a prominent John Birch Society theoretician. (The origins of the John Birch Society are detailed in AFA #11.) In addition to his doctrinaire racism, demonizing the likes of Martin Luther King, Griffin tags the Federal Reserve System as a manifestation of the “Zionist” financial cabal.

    The most outlandish of the fascisti whose “thinking” is featured in the film is David Icke. A former soccer player, Icke has reinvented himself as a political guru, disseminating the view that the world’s power structure is controlled by “reptilian shape-shifters” who pose as humans, eat young children and, somehow, are part and parcel to the international financial conspiracy advanced by Griffin, Gamble and company.

    Another of the old-line fascists whose ideology is contained in the film is Eustace Mullins, although his influence is upon Gamble’s theoretical outlook, rather than in “Thrive” itself. An unabashed admirer of Adolf Hitler, Mullins is among the seminal fascist ideologues to tab the Fed as an outcropping of the “international Jewish banking conspiracy.”

    Not surprisingly Icke, Mullins and Griffin have been extolled by the so-called “Truthers.” Both have also been featured on the program of former Fox pundit Glenn Beck.

    In addition to the New Age mysticism, the film’s cache among “progressives” is strengthened by the inclusion of the likes of Deepak Chopra, Amy Goodman and environmentalist (and Baskin & Robbins heir) John Robbins.

    This, in combination with the dumbing-down of America, has fueled the popularity of “Thrive.”

    Not surprisingly, the film has garnered a considerable following among the “Occupy” movement, according to author Johnson.

    “Thrive” appears to be among the most successful manifestations to date of counter-culture fascism, adding something of a bohemian flavor to the old adage that anti-Semitism is “the socialism of fools.”

    (Author Peter Levenda, among others, has chronicled the overlap of alternative religions such as Satanism with fascist and Nazi elements in his book Unholy Alliance. The alternative religious connection/New Age phenomenon is central to the success of works like “Thrive.”)

  9. Hollywood Tomfortas says :

    Interesting article about THRIVE in the Ashland, Oregon paper because the Director Stephen Gagne is from there. Thus this article is more a focus on him as the director. The article has been up since May 23 and the only comment so far is from someone laughing at the fact that there has been no reader response whatsoever. Also there is also no article about the film itself or its reception by the Ashland community.

    So let’s get them comments coming! Especially given the energy premise of the movie! (See below)

    http://www.dailytidings.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20120523/NEWS02/205230303/-1/NEWSMAP

    Power Play
    Local film examines the hold big energy producers have on the planet

    By John Darling
    For the Tidings
    Posted: 2:00 AM May 23, 2012

    A futuristic $7 million documentary film called “Thrive,” directed by Ashland resident Stephen Gagne, will have its Ashland premiere Thursday at the Varsity Theatre. There’ll be a panel discussion afterward featuring the movie’s producer-authors, Foster and Kimberly Gamble.

    The flashy and engaging film, rich in special effects produced by Liquid Buddha Studios in Ashland, was released last November. Its premise: that people can produce limitless, free energy and reduce wars and starvation related to energy, but backers of the old and expensive energy systems are standing in the way.

    The film is narrated on-screen by the Gambles, who seem to ride a “navigator, like a flying carpet” to any spot on Earth (or off it) as they explain who is controlling the world’s oil, gas, coal and nuclear resources and keeping them expensive, Foster Gamble said in a phone interview.

    Plentiful and cheap energy can be created using a doughnut-shaped structure called a torus, which creates harmonic resonance, amplifying and generating energy, Gamble says.

    “It’s a simple concept but hard to create devices that can access the energy directly,” he says.

    With the torus as a glowing fixture on the navigator set, the Gambles interview a range of authorities on energy and political systems — chiefly in the areas of energy, food, health care and education — and note how “we can … liberate our planet and our true human potential,” according to their website, http://www.thrivemovement.com. The film may be streamed free from that site.

    Gamble, an heir to the Proctor & Gamble fortune, has devoted his life to the study of alternative visions of “possible futures,” says Gagne, and has started think tanks and hung out with visionaries such as Buckminster Fuller.

    Gagne was lead director, director of photography and lead editor, with a staff of editors. They took the film through 21 rough edits. Gagne did sound editing at Skywalker Ranch in Marin County, Calif.

    The goal of the film, says Gamble, is “to help empower a self-creating and decentralized movement for thriving the world by furnishing basic information, not what’s being told us by the corporate media, about the environment, health, science, the media, the economic system — and to share tools that are most effective to restore our integrity and freedom.”

    Gagne, skilled at piano, clarinet and saxophone — and a frequent player on the local music scene — roughed out sketches of music for professionals in Los Angeles to score the film, which, he notes, uses 96 layers of sound that are not made “dark or manipulative” when accompanying criticism of present economic and political systems.

    The present systems resist, says Gamble, because “the vested interests in coal, oil, gas and nuclear have a $200 trillion piggy bank they don’t want broken, but it’s not just the money. The elite financial forces have a strong interest in controlling humanity by three big ways, the financial system, energy and food.

    “The possibility of off-the-grid devices in our homes, cars and factories would undermine all that.”

    The film has had more than 2 million views so far, says Gagne, noting the website offers more interviews with experts as well as a fact-checking site for what’s said in the film.
    ————————-
    John Darling is a freelance writer living in Ashland. E-mail him at jdarling@jeffnet.org.

  10. HungarianGuy says :

    I did not read this article, but I am happy to see this blog. I have watched Thrive a week ago, and it is a total bullshit, so i am happy to see there is someone to debunk it:D

  11. Hollywood Tomfortas says :

    David Icke himself responds to the “Dissociators”

    http://www.davidicke.com/headlines/66176-ten-people-featured-in-the-movie-thrive-issue-statement-dissociating-themselves-from-the-content

    The point these people clearly miss is this: I may not agree with what they say in the film, or some of the other contributors, but the dynamic is simple. They say what they think and the viewer decides what to make of what they say. Is that really too hard to grasp for these so-called ‘enlightened teachers’ and others?

    This is yet more blatant confirmation that the old New Age and ‘Green’ heroes are now so far off the pace and the cutting edge of human understanding that binoculars would be advised. Human-caused ‘climate change’ is a fact?? What?? And they have the nerve to talk about ‘bizarre theories’?

    Bloody hell.

  12. Hollywood Tomfortas says :

    I just discovered that THRIVE once had a Wikipedia page, but it was deleted 4 months ago.

    Check out the fascinating discussion that took place last January on the Deletion Log.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Articles_for_deletion/Thrive_(film)

  13. Realist says :

    I really appreciate your work and this blog. This New Age BS is starting to get seriously out of hand. All this conspiracy talk is like a religion right now, and boy are there some serious fanatacis and followers in this field. Internet have really blown the life into this movement. Fortunantely for everyone these people seem to be extremely stupid, and they are talking about EVERYTHING, so if you are well in home with one subject you know that they are full of shit, beacause they are utterly wrong on that specific field. And if one mofo is talking about medicine, physics, geography, history, economics etc., a thinking person will realise that this isn’t right..
    I am glad to see people who are ready to debunk this movement.
    Keep up the good work!

    • Antonio M says :

      “All this conspiracy talk is like a religion right now…”

      Be careful… Conspiracy theorists are nothing like people of Religion… Religion is based on Faith… These conspiracy theorists don’t base their beliefs on faith, they base them on paranoia… Don’t get it twisted…

      • panthervariable says :

        Faith is the religionist shield against fear, among other things. The comparison is not totally invalid. I would say that lacking a formal structure and adherence to their dogma would be more of an argument against it being religion-like.

  14. Angry Government Guy says :

    Hello, this is an agent from the Bureau of Investigation of National Security Threats. I would like to note that films such as Thrive are being investigated by the federal government for possible violations of the National Defense Authorization Act of Fiscal year 2012. Be warned that anyone facilitating in an attack against the United States, including propagation of false energy sources, can be indefinitely detained. Threats against our perfect Federal Reserve System are a national threat and will be treated as such.

    Mr. “Muertos”, as you approve this comment (I assume you will delete this line), let me congratulate you on behalf of the Rothschild association for doing a very good job of keeping track of dangerous groups like this. We will be working together quite often from now on.

    • Lee says :

      Where can i collect my pay?

      BTW since i have been defending the president since at least 2008, i deserve at least 4 years of accumulated pay IMO.

  15. Frederick Preserve says :

    Now wait a second… History is replete with conspiracies that the skeptics of the day chided in exactly the same way as this blog attempts to do. Also because the nature of so much of this revolves around financial and social order the fact is, it’s in the best interest of a status quo for this type of “retort” to exist at all…
    Debunking in itself is one of the most dogmatic and peer group oriented practices I can think of.. The crowd voice jeers…”you don’t really believe that… Do you?” and the reader reflexively gets back in line. I watched the film and much of what you’re calling conspiracy theory is true conspiracy… Where Is the shareholder list for the Federal Reserve? Why are they adding ammonium oxide to jet fuel and then partially denying its use? (They being the DOD) creating vapor trails that last for a whole day instead of a few moments… The banking families that have had a steady dialogue promoting world governance thru banking for over 100 years? GMO’s and other devices like them (genetically rengineered products) manufactured and released into the population with minimal study and no press… We don’t know what the long term or even short term efects will be or why the rush to market is so widely accepted in the US. There’s all sorts of things in the American diet that people in other parts of the world aren’t eating because these products do not meet their social safety mechanisms criteria. That’s not conspiracy that is fact… These are all facts. Checkable, provable, incontrovertable facts.

    Conspiracy theory is a trigger phrase… It’s a programmed device … Linguists like Frank Luntz as one very researchable architect of modern western think, understand the power of social pressure and the marketing of ideas through subconscious reactions to imagery and words. Edward Burnays is another example of a “social engineer” men who make the policies of the corporate elite “our” policies. Brand loyalty for life is an admitted objective of the corporate model. Debunking is a device like any other, and should be subject to as much scrutiny as the subject its debunking.

    There is a political agenda in the film and it’s Libertarian in its nature which isn’t immediately bad, but there’s no mention of Ayn Rand or Ron Paul.. These carachters illicit a response in people… Is that why you used them? Is the purpose to debunk or reprogram? Or is it the same thing? I can cypher through the market place of ideas without a guide and so can anyone else. The more exposure you have to information the more capable you become at breaking it down and using it one way or another.
    So this blog is just more information … Good or bad is irrelevant, and of course you’re promoting the film by being here.

    Skeptisim is a wonderful thing, it’s truly a one size fits all tool for the human mind which now is exposed to so much useless or manipulative input. Common sense and experience are the components of intuition the more we live the more we have of it. Unless you’ve submitted to an orthodoxy of one kind or another I believe you should trust your gut and weigh all sources with equal objectivity.

    • muertos says :

      A typical conspiracy theorist response. “But…but…but…my conspiracy theory is TWOO!”

      Investigate any of the conspiracy theories you refer to in this post as being potentially true (chemtrails, banking cabal, etc.) and you’ll see that there is no evidence to support any of them.

      • Frederick Preserve says :

        Lol … Straw man lets be specific
        List of share holders for fed?
        Ammonium oxide in jet fuel?
        Long term and short term peer reviews for genetically modified foods

        Typical? I’ll tell you what’s typical… Flat earthers that deny the curve of the earth, the rotation of the planet aroind the sun and not the reverse, fear of flight, electricity, space travel and God. You fear that which you don’t understand or cant control but yours is the cowards response…. You do the research because obviously you’re too afraid of what you might find.

      • muertos says :

        Explain how what I said to you constitutes a “straw man.” Be specific.

    • Mike Hover says :

      Nice try Frederick.
      You came back with a rational, well thought out response and it landed like the ton of bricks I expected from this little minded group of cartel appologists.
      Their heads would likely explode if they ever did their own research and found out that they are complete bass-ackwards in their critical thinking abilities.

    • diy says :

      This guy knows who Edward Bernays is! + fucking 1. He’s absolutely right about the dogmatic qualities of “debunking” and “conspiracy theory” as a trigger phrase.

    • stratoblaster says :

      well said
      good job Fredrick. Expect adolescent ridicule from Muertos and the fact averse here who define conspiracy as fiction…They frame the term far from its actual definition standing aloft of open cases such as 911 Chemtrails, crop circles, shadow banking, gmo dangers, as tho the book is closed on them. They lack the conclusions and evidence required to close these books but rant like fundamentalists when we remind them of the actual facts as Fredrick did above.

  16. Torsten Pihl says :

    Well said, thanks. I added Thrive Debunked to the Conspiracies and Denials section of Debunkatron.

    • muertos says :

      Thanks! This is terrific! I’ve always loved the Debunkatron and it’s an honor to be included. Keep crushing those tinfoil hats!

  17. Ben p says :

    You Zionist scum with words no one understands you make me sick trying to undermine everything piss off cunt

    • muertos says :

      Wow, you Thrive fans sure know a lot about peace, love and understanding, don’t you!

      • Antonio M says :

        Hey… Don’t let that whack-job talk to you like that… These 40 year old, basement dwelling mama’s boys need to be put in their place…

      • Mike Hover says :

        Peace, love and understanding are reserved for those who are still capable of stepping out of their delusions.

  18. thunderphunktheauthor says :

    I know for a fact that the pharmaceutical companies have a heavy influence on the education of new doctors. I have doctors in my family. I also know for a fact that the Gerson Therapy is a legitimate natural cure to many illnesses and the only flaw to the therapy is the coffee enema because coffee absorbs too many electrolytes to be applied directly to the anus. I know for a fact, that pharmaceutical companies suppress medical knowledge and gradually upgrade medicines to maximize profits. You can ask anyone who has ever had cancer and were brave enough to try an alternate route. As far as aliens, we know we cannot be alone, there are too many solar systems for us to feel so special. And we all know that energy companies suppress technological advances to keep their products relevant. You don’t have to be a conspiracy theorist to see that, it’s completely obvious. As far as the power of the Torus, I can not verify that. But we do know that there are thousands of inventions more efficient and powerful than combustion engines…especially the gas combustion engine! And as far as the Federal Reserve being corrupt, you would have to be a complete tool to think it isn’t. And to think that our politicians aren’t corrupt you have to be completely oblivious to your surroundings. And the author of this blog tries to disparage the intelligence level of the people who watch these videos in a liberate attempt to manipulate it’s readers into feeling superior for not watching or not believing. I wouldn’t ask anyone to believe something without proof…That’s what Christians do…But I do invite you to check for yourself in not videos but many pieces of literature support a few of the claims, most credible of them being the works of Noam Chomsky. I’m not saying everything Gamble said was true, but I am saying alot of what he said wasn’t false. And alot of the people “debunking” on the comments seem to have a deep need to feel intellectually or morally superior than the next person. As far as 9/11 goes most of my college professors say that a jet fuel cannot make a building explode in such a way. And my physics and chemistry professors are way smarter than all of you…blessings

  19. Amber says :

    Just to say thank you for this! I’ve had friends trying to convince me to believe so many of the things mentioned in this article…. I am grateful to have this reality check. Likely they will continue to believe the conspiracy theories no matter what I say, but I’m grateful to be able to inform myself and have a balanced view on it. Well written and many good points. Thank you so much.

  20. Dasturd says :

    What I want to know is who is running this website? Someone is paying for it’s space and information transferring on their cable bill? There are a handful of very good speakers in here all supporting the “debunking” with highly intelligent insight of human behaviour, thinking, and how to say what people need to hear “currently” to believe them. No matter what is said, they have ways of twisting their views into yours with ridicule. If I were one of the wealthiest people in the world and I was involved in a “World Domination Agenda”…I would definetely spend thousands of dollars to have brilliant debunkers form a successful blog debunking such an eye-opening film like “Thrive”.

    Woah…what’s this guy smoking? This is exactly what I’m talking about they get all defensive and rant like (something clever and demeaning). They’re all paranoid, this guy is so paranoid. Crazy, whack job, whack nut, nut whacker, fudge packer, look at my email name and make assumptions perhaps. What can you say now?

    Is there any significance to the coordination of quilt patterns for profile pictures here? Movies like thrive spread awareness. We are so dominated by the culture YOU’RE speaking from making movies and doing internet activism is really all that can be done…for now. Eventually…there will be an economic collapse…unless you already know that and your hired Super-Trolls and everyone will start to wake up pretty quick after that.

    • Dasturd says :

      I see that it is randomly generated profile pictures. Mine happens to be my favorite color, what fun.

    • Wyboth says :

      1. WordPress is free, you dope.

      2. I found this website after I saw a clip from Thrive and was outraged with their claims. I came here and found many people deluded by them, and I felt like I should say something, so I stayed. I think many of the other people here did the same.

      3. The “what’s this guy smoking?” reaction is relevant for some of the worst comments on here, where they are literally too stupid to say anything to.

      4. Correct me if I’m wrong, but I believe the quilt pattern is made by WordPress as well.

  21. Nova Lux says :

    This is a very well wriitten article. What a pity that it is so wrong and helping people with closed minds stay closed.

    I’ve spent 40 years studying alterbative views of subjects and there is no doubt that ecl;ectic study will clearly show that we are all being oppressed by a massive conspiracy by the powers that be that has been in place for an extremely long time.

    The problem is that most people wontbe brace enough to come out of their comfort zone to look at new ideas that overturn their established world view. Psychologisits understand the reason for this and it is no different than people thinking the wrold was flat once upon a time.

    Thios eof us who have made the fffort to undersdtand how the wor,d truly is run are not only up against ignorance and poeples inabiulity to study the facts but also up against the controlled opposition who muddy the waters with stupid conspiracy theories that make conspracy facts not worth investigating for the ignorant.

    There iw nothing more ignorant than the unwillingness to look at something you know nothing about.

    • Wyboth says :

      And where is your evidence for this? If the Illuminati really exist, prove it. Show me the results of your “studies” that prove that they exist.

      You see, this is what grinds my gears. People making unreferenced claims. That’s what got a lot of people in the hole in the first place. You see, if a claim looks like baloney and it sounds like baloney, it’s probably baloney. But, if the person making the claim references something that proves the claim, then it’s not baloney to the person anymore. But if the person doesn’t cite anything, then it makes it more likely to be baloney. Let’s face it: I could make up a conspiracy and not link to anything to prove it. When asked “Where’s the proof?” I can’t respond, because there is no proof, because I made it up! I’m sure that this is the case for many conspiracies. Normal people, when they see that it looks like baloney and the author doesn’t cite any sources, will dismiss it. Why? They have common sense. They know that people make shit up on the internet. It looks like it’s made up, and there are no sources, so they’re not going to believe it.

      But conspiracy theorists, they’re different. They tend to believe more of what they see without evidence, especially if it fits their worldview. This is dangerous. It can lead them to believe in things that are not true, which can make them say and do things that may not be in their best interest. For example, say a normal person saw someone saying “The rapture is tomorrow!” They’d say, “Pssh, you’ve got to be kidding me.” But when a conspiracy theorist sees it, they would probably believe it. Assuming they’re Christian, they’d probably want to humble themselves before their judgement day. They’d sell their house, and give away all their money. Then, when the next day comes and the world doesn’t end, what is the conspiracy theorist? Broke! And the normal person is just fine.

      Bottom line: Everyone needs some degree of skepticism. Think about something before you believe it. Trust your brain, not your gut.

      • Nova Lux says :

        As I said “After 40 years of eclectic study ……………” There is intractability on both sides of the argument. I agree that one should consider eveything and believe nothing but rejecting a subject because it doesnt fit your preconceived world view and not studying it in proper depth is also not the answer. The whole basis of conspiracies is the fact that the evidence has been well hidden and most people who reject alternative views reject them without intelliget study and cant be bothered to look for the answers. We are all like mushrooms. “Kept in the dark and fed on bullshit!”

      • Wyboth says :

        I notice you didn’t give me your proof that I asked for, hmm…

        Now, you’re getting me entirely wrong as to why I reject the idea that a new world order exists. I reject it because there is no evidence of it existing, not because it doesn’t fit in my worldview. I know all about worldview; I’ve been throwing that in the face of pro-lifers for years. I could go on about my reasons why it’s fake, but I will save my breath and tell you to read Muertos’s world domination conspiracies debunked article. It says everything that I would say, but it says them better.

  22. jean-michel says :

    good article! thanks! interesting to have another point of view! was just a bit disappointed by your solution! donate money! lol! that is an illusion too! you do or you do not! money is like clicking an internet button ;) helping donating medicine is donating money to Pharmaceuticals not the poor african people which with medicine are going to be able to suffer a bit longer! lol! Give blood?! wow you aren’t read or know nothing about blood my friend! how the system make money with blood? when it has been proven and use that using seawater as a natural fluid for transfusion is better! it’s been stopped in France because of whatever political reasons! same as the propaganda about dairy was made again in France about the good health benefits of it with no scientific proof (and still not proven!) whatsoever just because the biggest dairy farmer consortium’s president of the time was friend with the president! and so on so on! donating money is about as useful as clicking your interet activism button theory! same with donating blood or else as you deprive dying people of their own responsability for their health and their life! well anyway, i wasting my time now lol

    • a rational person says :

      transfusions with seawater? are you fucking kidding me?

      HAH AHA HAH AHAHA HA HAHAHH HAHAH AAHAHAH HAAHHA HA HAHAHA HAHAHAHAHA AHHAHA AH HA HA A H AHAHAHHAHA HA HAHAHHAH AHAHAHAHH AA HAHAHAH A HAHAHAHAH AHAHHA HA HAHAHAH A AHHA AH AH AHAHAH AHAHHAHA HA AHAHAHAH AHHAHAHAHAH A AHA HAHHA!!!!!!!!!!

      wow…thanks for the laugh, nutbag…i needed a good dose of humor today. seawater transfusions…u probably really beleive in this too…jesus h christ, what other useless retarded bullshit will nutbags like you fall for?

  23. BY: Joshua Shanholtz says :

    [ADMIN EDIT: MULTIPLE POST REMOVED - SPAM]

  24. Lazy Elf says :

    grrr.. dmn it.. i don’t know what to believe anymore..
    well global domination elite is a hoax..
    i should just stick to to fact of poverty, inequality, war.
    how about john perkins ? he’s solid about the corporatocracy. also a book from james blunt (if i’m not mistaken) titled rogue state and killing hope.

    • anticultist says :

      John Perkins can not provide legitimate evidence for his claims, he does tell a good story and it sounds exciting and plausible at some times, but pretty much everything he said can not be corroborate by third party or independent sources.

      You might as well be taking my word for it.

      • Lazy Elf says :

        well it does have similarities with william blum’ books (it wasn’t james blunt lol)
        oh i think john pilger & amy goodman is solid right ?

  25. Cassie Blake says :

    Listen instead of talk. Be Active. Be aware, do something to make the world a better place.Poverty, war, famine,murder, cruelty,animal meat, Fuskishima,the slave trade,zero hour contracts, the bedroom tax, homelessness,troika and JFK warned of secret societies before he was shot and Fema camps have just been outed by Obama.Conspiracy theorists just making money out of facts with spin and controversy,60% truth 40% spin and fear, lines their pockets.Pretend they are giving us solutions, most are selling stuff, books, DVD’s, T shirts, they make us think the merchandise is secondary, it is not, they do this for a living that is why they will kill you rather than let you debunk it.The illusion they are under is that it makes a difference, why not, they say, what are you doing to change things?A dose of guilt and you are off their case.I look to my belief in God in love and in those who walk their talk not just strut their stuff in daylight and and revert to type at night.Icke is a bad guy who fiercely protects his public image to sell.TPV on which Thrive broadcast is a private limited company, set up with half a million pounds of public donations.How many starving mouths would that feed instead of regurgitating outlandish New Age stuff.Yes we are more than our bodies but all that spiritual stuff is redundant if you can turn a blind eye to suffering for a career in the alternative media. What else do I need to know. Follow the money.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 141 other followers

%d bloggers like this: